DUPLICATE ROAD NUMBERS                                            Index

Despite having a vast number of available designations, the authorities have still managed to allocate a surprisingly large amount of numbers to more than one road.

This section attempts to list all of the cases where road numbers are duplicated. These will be completely different roads, but with the same number (not including cases where a multiplex occurs - a road sharing the route of another road, such as the M62 in Greater Manchester). Generally these roads will be some distance apart, often 100 miles or more, but some are quite close together.

 

A594

Original road: Papcastle to Maryport, Cumbria

 

B3206

Original road: Easton to Chagford, Devon

 

Second road: Leicester Ring Road

 

 

Second road: Ash, Surrey

A601

Original road: Derby Inner Ring Road

 

B3330

Original road: Ryde to Brading, Isle of Wight

 

Second road: Carnforth Link Roads, Lancashire (A601(M))

 

 

Second road: Winchester to M3 J10

A1042

Original road: Norwich Outer Ring Road

 

B3331

Original road: Kite Hill to Ferry, Isle of Wight

 

Second road: Kirkleatham to Redcar, Teesside

 

 

Second road: Winchester

A1114

Original road: Blaydon to Teams, Gateshead

 

B3440

Original road: Willand to Uffculme, Devon

 

Second road: Great Baddow to Howe Green, Chelmsford

 

 

Second road: West Wick to Weston-super-Mare, Somerset

A1199

Original road: Canonbury to Highbury, London

 

B4027

Original road: Over Kiddington to Wheatley, Oxfordshire

 

Second road: Cambridge Park to Woodford Green, London

 

 

Second road: Binley to Cross-in-Hand, Warwickshire

A4102

Original road: Merthyr Tydfil

 

B4065

Original road: Droitwich Spa, Worcestershire

 

Second road: Amblecote, West Midlands

 

 

Second road: Ansty to Wolvey, Warwickshire

B198

Original road: Cheshunt South Western Bypass, Hertfordshire

 

B4082

Original road: Pershore to Upton Snodbury, Worcestershire

 

Second road: Wisbech, Cambridgeshire (formerly A47)

 

 

Second road: Binley to Little Heath, West Midlands

B454

Original road: London NW9

 

B5038

Original road: Stoke-on-Trent

 

Second road: Brentford to Southall

 

 

Second road: Trentham to Clayton, Staffordshire

B2122

Original road: Brighton

 

B5544

Original road: Mold to Llong

 

Second road: Leatherhead, Surrey

 

 

Second road: Pentre-chwyth to Winsh-wen, Swansea

B3165

Original road: Somerton to Lyme Regis

 

B6374

Original road: Galashiels to Melrose, Borders

 

Second road: Ash, Surrey

 

 

Second road: Heage to Ripley, Derbyshire

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UN-USED ROADS

England

1. In Manchester, the A57(M) motorway has an unfinished slip road that hangs 20 feet in the air. It is hidden from view from the road. It had been constructed

    incorrectly and if completed would have taken traffic the wrong way down a one-way street.

2. In London, the M11 motorway has two short unused slips at Junction 4 (Charlie Brown's) which would have been a link for the M12 motorway to head 

    East into Essex.

3. Newcastle has two ramp stubs on the Northbound Central Motorway East (originally A1(M), now A167(M)), links from a proposed Central Motorway  

    East By-Pass (A third Northbound link was opened as the local access from Camden St.).

4. In Surrey, the M23 begins with Junction 7 and has a ramp stub that was intended to extend the M23 further into London.

5. On many early rural motorways, ramp stubs can be found at locations proposed for Motorway Service Areas. Sites for services were designated at regular 

    intervals, about 12 or 13 miles apart, and the ramp stubs built as part of the original motorway construction. Land adjacent to the motorway was often 

    obtained for the future services - usually a neat circular or hexagonal plot that is easily identified on aerial photos: e.g., M18 near Hatfield. While many of 

    these original sites were opened as service areas, those remaining unused are now unlikely ever to be developed, either because the sites are too small and

    restricted, or because they're just in the wrong place: Doncaster North services recently opened less than 2 miles from the ramp stubs at Hatfield.

6. Improvement works in 1987 rerouted the A47 in Rutland near Wardley resulting in an unused stretch of carriageway being left behind which functions only 

    as access to a transmitting station.

7. The former line of the A33 Winchester Bypass remains very clear on the ground after having been replaced by the M3 motorway through Twyford Down.

8. When a new bypass was built in the North of Leicester, the old Thurmaston Lane was made obsolete. The road was not however, subject to demolition

    and now lies gated off, abandoned and delapidated.

9. In 1979, after continued efforts at maintenance, the A625 road on the South side of Mam Tor, Derbyshire, was closed due to the instability of the shale 

    layers. The road lies abandoned and crumbling.

10.There are several sections of the old route of the A30 in Cornwall, between Launceston and Bodmin following the upgrading and rebuilding of the route to

     a dual-carriage way. The most visible of which is at Jamaica Inn near Bodmin where the old stretch of road runs next to the dual carriage way.

Scotland

     Glasgow's M8 motorway has several ramp stubs built for the abandoned Inner Ring Road. The most famous examples are the West Street ramps at 

  Junction 20 (Kingston), and another pair can be found at Junction 15 (Townhead). There are also ramp stubs on the Westbound M8 between Junctions 16

  and 17, for an un-built motorway leading out to the North and West.

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